11 Homemade Pumpkin Dog Treat Recipes From Easy to Elegant

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Incorporating the fantastic health benefits of pumpkin into your dog’s diet just got a whole lot easier thanks to this definitive list of our favorite pumpkin dog treat recipes.

We’ve listed our pumpkin homemade dog treats from easiest (right from the can), to hardest (pumpkin cupcakes with peanut butter and cream cheese frosting). So there’s definitely something for every mood and skill level.

Pumpkin is great for evening out doggie digestive issues thanks to a healthy dose of fiber. That and a nice dose of beta carotene, fatty acids, and antioxidants make pumpkin a healthy addition to almost any dog’s diet.



DIY treats don’t get any easier than this — add a spoonful of canned pumpkin puree to your dog’s regular kibble as a tasty meal topper.

You can substitute cubed frozen pumpkin pieces or go with fresh if you have some on hand.



Want to take it to the next level but don’t want to turn on the oven? Stuff a Kong with pureed pumpkin and kibble and freeze it for a longer-lasting treat. More great Kong stuffing ideas here.



One step beyond plain pumpkin is this effortless frozen treat recipe. We add plain yogurt to pureed pumpkin and freeze it for a crunchy summertime treat.

For dogs on a limited ingredient diet, homemade treats can seem out of reach, but thanks to the dehydrator (or a low oven), you can make single-ingredient treats your dog will love.

Fresh pumpkin makes a tasty and healthy chew thanks to a few hours in the dehydrator. You can remove the bright orange skin before dehydrating if your dog has a hard time digesting or chewing it.



Stepping it up a notch from frozen treats, we take frozen pumpkin and blitz it in the food processor with yogurt and a touch of maple syrup for a creamy treat that’s tasty to humans too.

8. Pumpkin Spice Lattes for Dogs

This recipe looks 100% fancier than the effort required to pull it off. In fact, here it is: Mix equal parts pureed pumpkin and plain yogurt (add a little water for pourability) and serve it in a dainty cup or bowl.

Top with a dollop of yogurt or coconut whipped cream for a special treat. Need extra credit? Zazz it up with a light dusting of heart-healthy and anti-inflammatory turmeric to boost your presentation to the ‘gram-worthy level.

No-bake treats are so fast and fun to make, and a fluffy coating of unsweetened coconut flakes on the outside makes these extra adorable. Perfect for making with the kids.

Baking up a batch of our ‘pupkin spice’ pumpkin dog biscuits will make your house smell like a happiness factory. Our holiday-inspired spice blend is healthy for dogs and does not contain nutmeg, which contains myristicin, which is toxic to dogs.

This cookie recipe is perfect for your favorite seasonal cookie cutters, and you can use any flour you wish, from whole wheat flour to our favorite staple, oat flour.

If your dog’s favorite treats are soft and toothsome instead of crunchy biscuits,  we’ve got them covered with their very own soft-baked cookie treats inspired by classic peanut butter cookies.

Go beyond plain old dog biscuits for the holidays or just any old day! We make mini pie crusts with oat flour and applesauce and add a simple pie filling of pumpkin and mashed bananas. Top with a splash of Greek yogurt or coconut whipped cream for an extra fancy presentation.

When you absolutely, positively gotta pull out all the stops for a special occasion, our pumpkin cupcakes with peanut butter and cream cheese frosting will wow your human and canine friends alike.

Storing, Serving, and Safety

Safety note: When baking for dogs, be sure to read up on dog-safe ingredients (or just follow our recipes, which are designed just for our furry friends).

Because all these tasty treats contain fresh veggies (which hold moisture and cause mold), you will want to store your homemade dog treats in an airtight container. Baked goods are fine on the counter for up to 3 days, and should be refrigerated or frozen if you won’t use them up in that time.

As for serving, you know your dog best. Dog treats shouldn’t make up over 10% of your dog’s diet, though if you’re training or indulging, you can always adjust the amount of dog food in the daily feeding regimen.

More Great Treat Recipes for Dogs

Want to get beyond pumpkin dog treats? Here’s some other tried and true recipes from Kiki’s canine kitchen

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